A thread on MacRumors after the launch of the original iPod in 2001.

What I find most interesting about this thread is how ignorant people were of what Apple was really doing. Given the launch of the iPad, we're all a bit wiser (we'd like to think) of what Apple intends on doing with the device, so this time the arguments aren't just about how limited the device is in hardware features, but how closed the thing is to anything not approved by Apple.

I'm staying out of this whole iPad debate because I find the entire thing a colossal waste of energy. I am in the middle of trying to launch this company, get work, and adjust to my new life. The last thing I care to fixate on is what Apple does with Apple's money to make money.

I am a zealot about me, and less about standards, DRM, or whatever argument of the day is. Perhaps I'll regret it later, but for now it's fun to watch this stuff play out. Mostly I think because it's not a major investment, something I'd really like to try out at our house, and like the AppleTV won't be the only game in town for very long.

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After four and a half years I've decided to leave Federated Media. It has been the most rewarding work experience of my life. It wasn't always easy, but it was always worth it.

From the early, depressing days of machines falling over, Mike Arrington emailing, stuff just not working right, numbers off, and unhappy sales people—to seeing really smart people have a look at us and say, "Yes, I'll join" and then watching as these people come in and do some brilliant work. It's pretty much everything you could hope for when joining a company on the ground floor.

When you are a founder you have something like 1/4 or 1/5 of the company under your control. The four of you are sitting in a room just pounding away on your parts, trusting everyone is doing what they need to be doing.

Slowly as people join you give up a bit here and there, pretty soon you're at 1/10 or 1/20. I don't mean actual authority, I just mean you have to trust people with some of your stuff for the company to be successful. You can't do it all, and if you can find people who will own a bit of your 1/5 then you can focus on just the bits that really need your attention.

Without a phone call from John Battelle I would have missed out on an incredible experience. I cannot thank him, or the co-founders: Chas Edwards, Jennifer Charette, and Ken Snider enough for trusting me with the engineering portion of this company.

Very recently as we were restructuring, I realized that most of my original 1/5 was pretty much covered by smart, competent people who are just killing it. And that's when the startup itch returned. Getting back to the little room, thinking about big plans, forgetting what it's like when the servers are falling over…

I'll have more on this later. For now you can go ogle the obligatory, enigmatic landing page designed by my wife and partner for the new company here: http://simpleform.com/ and I'll have more about what I'm up to in the coming month.

I am also open to the following: beers, lunch, consulting of all types (I did put an engineering team together that stayed together for over four years), and any and all advice from people who've done this before me.

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Indie Relief is a Mac software fundraiser for Haiti. All proceeds from today's (January 20th) purchases will go to charities chosen by the developers. Such a great idea. Buy something!

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Your New Company Randomizer.

"A(n) enterprise iPhone app for drug addicts to buy friends." "A social networking platform for developers to find friends." "A(n) enterprise ad server for businesses to find sex."

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The ProjectTicker is the real-time inventory of all of the jobs active in the Integrated department.”

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I think Alex Payne's post titled Don't Be A Hero is a must read for engineers, but even more so for managers of engineers.

Hell, everyone who works on teams should read this.

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I've had this idea in my head but I doubt I'll ever use it for anything, so I wanted to write it down.

When I pause a TV show, on TiVo or Netflix I assume the play head will stop exactly where I left it. When I hit play it starts from precisely that point. This is great for when I pause to use the restroom or grab a glass of water.

However, when I pause and to go to sleep or to take care of dinner, I wish the play-head would slowly creep backwards until finally stopping at a good 20 seconds before where I originally stopped the play-head.

I often find myself hitting the 30-second rewind button on my TiVo controller whenever I come back to something I've been watching. It'd be nice if that could be programmed into what I'm using.

This idea though isn't about play-heads, it's about cutting out those small interactions we inevitably find ourselves participating in when we don't need to. My iPhone knows that if I just locked my device and decided to restart it within a few seconds it won't ask me for my passcode again. The same happens with the OS X screen saver password.

In both cases time affects precision or control of a variable which in turn, I think, provides a comfortable interaction. I like that.

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My wife has started a new companion weblog to her very popular We♥Prints site called We♥Art.

In her searches for affordable prints she tends to run into the not-so-affordable but beautiful works of art that she wants to point to. Really stunning stuff over there.

http://www.weheartart.com/

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This is a hilarious project. It takes a picture via your webcam the moment your merge fails and posts it to Twitpic and Twitter.

(For the non-tech, this is when you merge the branch of code you've been working on with the main code base. When it fails you have to pick through it like a fisherman undoing a bad cast. It usually happens 10 minutes before your train is supposed to leave the office.)

via andy

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Merlin talking at IDEO. This is a really good talk. I hadn't seen it before.

Most people in the position of offering people advice seem to gravitate towards prolonging people's need for that advice. It's fascinating to see someone realize that and struggle with what it is he's found himself the king of.

I was a huge fan of Merlin's site when he first launched it. I read the GTD book and noticed the more I developed my own homebrew system, the less I need these types of sites in my newsreader. Now everything goes into Taskpaper, and I just work my way down through the day. Stuff spills over, whatever.

I also tweak it every now and then. Recently I started marking everything in my inbox as read. It's no longer a todo list of unmarked/bold email that switches state when I happen to glance at it. If it's in my inbox it's unread. Works for me, probably won't for you.

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These 3d post cards are just lovely. My eye keeps going for unicolor animal toys. I think having a little boy who loves little animals (he squeaks when you ask him what sound a monkey makes) has tuned me into them.

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I'm not even going to ask to borrow $3.95 million dollars. Things would be weird between us, and you'd probably get all jerky at Christmas like, "Oh, I see you could buy everyone a KindleDX but couldn't swing the $98,750 you owe me this month on the loan! I'm Just Saying!"

So anyway, this home designed by Richard Neutra is for sale for $3.95 million. Which is a STEAL if you are the sort of person who buys things for 3.95 million dollars.

Either the person who staged it or the previous owner (who spent 10 years restoring it) made some mistakes, I think you can spend the .05 million you're saving on this place and get some new lights and kitchen appliances.

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I want to believe. Really I do. But the Nexus One still seems to draw two complaints in reviews:

  • A lot of UI work to be done to homogenize applications
  • Phone UI itself rough around the edges
  • Jeff Clavier on GDGT

When I was a kid there was this science show (I forget the name) that discussed an example of a ball falling to the ground. The question posed was what if the ball halved the distance each second, how long would it take for the ball to hit the ground? The answer was infinity, and that's what I feel like with Android.

Each iteration seems LEAPS ahead of the previous version. Apparently this phone hardware is much faster and has a very nice screen, but the UI still needs "an iteration or two" and that's the problem for me. They keeping needing that.

When they get microscopically close, perhaps I'll take another look, but I'm beginning to feel like it's just never going to happen.

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That only music from 2010 project I mentioned? I'm keeping a weblog here: radio.torrez.org.

Right now I'm going through the 09's looking for stuff I missed. There's no way I can go without music for a month, so January 2010 I'm allowing myself to catch up to last year's music.

I think I'll have a go at reviews—but reviews are like, just my opinion, man.

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My favorite blog of 2009 is Chris Dixon's. If you're in Tech you have to be reading this blog.

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Screw the other lists. This is truly the 30 Best Blogs right now.

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