You may have heard that Delicious is shutting down (or not?). Someone on Twitter suggested that a group of engineers should get together on a weekend and build a Delicious clone. In anticipation of this mystery group of people sitting down and doing this, I thought I'd make a quick todo list for them.

  1. Account System - You'll have to adopt all the standard patterns that are typical of a web application:
    1. Database to hold accounts.
    2. Register and install an SSL cert to appease the security minded. Also: where are you hosting this? What database? MySQL? Good. InnoDB? If you're deploying with another engineer, have the typical 30 minute conversation about deploying databases every two hours.
    3. Decide on the ORM, or just write some lightweight classes that do the tedious crap. Hopefully you selected a framework that has some helpers for all the verification options otherwise…
    4. Methods in the User account model to verify email, length and strength of password, a good idea of the account names you want to hold back so you can still make paths like /admin or /static later on.
    5. Lost password flow. You'll want to generate a key and store it someplace for when someone requests to reset their password. So that's another email that has to go out.
    6. Sign In flow.
    7. Sign Out flow. (Be sure and use a POST method to sign out. See why here <- signs you out of delicious)
    8. Sign up, display errors.
    9. Update your settings, name, password, email—Doh! You'll have to verify the email again.
    10. An account verification system done through email so you can verify people have given the correct information.
    11. Scheduled backups of your database being pushed to a separate location. Binlogs? Mysqldump? You'll have to write a script or configure your off-site DB slave. You might also want to test that it works.
    12. Oh hey, you can delete your account on Delicious? What does this mean for the bookmarks, favorites, and friend relationship interfaces you haven't even written yet? Save that one for later I guess.
  2. Following and being followed flow. This includes:
    1. A database for holding friend relationships.
    2. An interface for looking at everyone you follow.
    3. An interface for looking at everyone who follows you.
    4. Ability on each of the above pages to follow (or unfollow), probably using AJAX because people don't want to leave the page. Also you're going to want to paginate that, some people are popular.
    5. Blocking followers and the processes that recognize a follower has been blocked when displaying content.
    6. The required database indexes for extracting and displaying follower counts.
  3. So before we get to bookmarks, what about import tools? Why would anyone move to your system without import tools? You will need:
    1. A task queue. Hopefully distributed so you can pass importing off to your workers on other boxes when things get overloaded.
    2. Some sense of the different formats you'll need to process. Delicious being the big one, but there's Google's product, Diigo, Xmarks and Pinboard. Also people are going to want to import from their browsers. I'm not even talking about actually processing these things, just understanding and researching the formats and pitfalls is going to take some time.
    3. Actually doing the processing. What happens when something fails? Do you offer a report? There's a new page. Can they retry without duplicating inserts? I'm really only scratching the surface here, this is tedious shit.
  4. Tags. Related tags. Searching tags. Recent tags. Explore tags. You gotta use that task queue for offloading a lot of this. When does it run? What happens when it fails? Seriously, I don't even want to think about tags right now. There has to be a module out there that will do it. Go read the docs to that.
  5. Three letters: A P & I.
  6. You are going to write unit tests for all this, right?

You still haven't fully inspected all your XSS issues, implemented the searching of content, thought about design and UI, errors and documentation, the various methods for storing links like bookmarklets (tested in every browser), or, you know, actually saving bookmarks to a database for presentation to you and others.

Then there's pattern matching on URLs that can be an issue (http://xyz.com/ versus http://www.xyz.com versus https://xyz.com/ versus http://xyz.com/index.html ), I never really thought about that problem, I'm sure it will only take a few minutes. We can deal with it later.

(Thanks to usernameguy and Anil for some inspiration.)

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I switch browsers every year or so. Last year Chrome was my default browser after switching from Firefox (which had become achingly slow), and I switched from Chrome to Safari because it supported 1Password. While Chrome now supports 1Password integration, I am happy with Safari and don't see a reason to change.

The only thing I miss from Firefox is the Merge All Windows function. You could hit “⌘-SHIFT-M” and all your windows would be gathered in one window with tabs. (Though, now I can't find this feature and I'm wondering if it was a plugin I'd used.)

Safari has this feature, but not accessible with Keyboard Shortcuts. Here is the menu as it looks before you do this. The option is there, but you have to grab your mouse and select from the menu.

exciting graphic

By the way, this also doubles as a tutorial for adding command keys to any application's menu (as far as I know) in OS X.

Open up System Preferences and choose "Keyboard" and then hit the "Keyboard Shortcuts" tab.

I have to admit, I had no idea I could do this until a year or so ago.

Select the little plus sign in the center of the window and in the popup select Safari for the application and type "Merge All Windows" (the wording is important) for the Menu Title.

So tempted to start adding command keys to every app. Must. Not Fiddle.

For the Keyboard Shortcut box, simply type the shortcut “⌘-SHIFT-M” and it will fill it in for you.

Click "Add" and now head back to Safari. Your new Keyboard Shortcut is now in place.

I love my computer.

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When Steve at Coudal.com asked me to be the guest editor for links I was initially hesitant. I used to consider myself a pretty good source for finding interesting stuff. My day was so predictable that I knew I'd have an hour or so in the morning to check my newsreader before meetings started. An hour or so during meetings to check again. And maybe during a few minutes in between meetings I'd write a quick blog post about something interesting I'd seen.

When I left my job in January so did my free time in between meetings. Now every day is a race to see how much work I can cram into the 8 hours or so I have to work before running home to make dinner, clean up, and get to bed.

So for the next month I've carved an hour or so into my schedule to get back into gathering links. I've missed out on so much good stuff, both software related and otherwise that I'm hoping November will turn out to be very productive for this old weblog of mine.

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William Gibson's latest book "Zero History" is being released tomorrow. In anticipation I've been reading through the previous two novels in the trilogy. And once again I'm looking at the Buzz Rickson flight jackets. If San Francisco ever got cold enough to wear these I'd probably buy one today.

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I'm giving Apple's new product Ping a try. For no reason other than I hope they do implement these things, here is a few stuff I wish it would do.

  • Keep track of every song I listen to and post it someplace with charts and shit. I still have to use Last.fm.
  • An open REST API so I can pull that data or permit other applications to pull that data.
  • Treat my collection as one group, not of stuff I bought from iTunes and stuff I didn't buy from iTunes.
  • I don't want to like someone's like.

Anyway, you can follow me here.

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While having lunch today with rodbegbie we talked a bit about companies we like that we pay to use and are happy to pay to use. I can think of four right off the bat, but I'd love to hear if you have any you particularly like.

These companies are of course a huge influence on my thinking in this post about Simpleform and mlkshk, and absolutely what I am trying to emulate.

@ me on Twitter, I'm torrez.

Update: Some nice companies sent in via Twitter:

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There's a project in San Francisco called The Awesome Project (link to news article) that is actually a pretty good idea—but, San Francisco being San Francisco there is the inevitable project that is creating "audio tours for ferry rides across the San Francisco Bay that address the consequences of rising sea levels." Christ. Or done to death "displays pictures of the sky taken every 10 seconds for a year from a camera atop the Exploratorium."

Anyway, Twitter account here. Web site here. Let's hope there are more "string zip-lines from the Transamerica Pyramid" and less "paint a flower for every prarie dog that will die today."

UPDATE: I just re-read this and I don't know why I'm so grumpy about these ideas. Idea people really should just use Kickstarter though.

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If you were a fan of We ♥ Prints my wife has expanded and moved it to a new site that not only publishes prints, but all forms of art that is affordable and good. It's called Hey Stuff and she's been posting several items a day so be sure to add it to your newsreader.

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Imagesoak is a fantastic application for finding things to read and look at based on the interesting photos and images that accompany them. Nevermind what I just said, just go there and start scrolling. I've already made it my homepage.

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As we get Simpleform going one thing I think I've absolutely settled on is that I don't want to take any investment money from anyone. We have earned (old fashioned LOL!) enough this year while consulting to not have to think about it as we set out to build our product, and I think we'll be fine for next year too, so we have some running room. Plus I can sell a guitar or something if things get crazy.

When I left Federated Media I had this idea in my head of what I wanted to do next. And not just "next" but "from now on". It didn't have to do with a specific product or industry, though advertising* was definitely low on the list. A rough recounting of what goals I wanted to achieve:

  1. Make money (duh)
  2. Like and respect the people I work with
  3. Really enjoy my day and feel like I got something done
  4. No pointless meetings
  5. Making something I'm proud of

I follow a few VCs on Twitter and have talked to even fewer in person. While they have all been extremely kind, thoughtful, and blindingly smart, I came away from any those interactions thinking "I don't see their money benefiting me for anything I want to do" and so I haven't pursued that route any further. I think VCs are great for people who need to load up a factory with equipment or perhaps invest in some serious tech that isn't readily built by a couple people in a room, but I think it's mostly a bit of a cheat that only serves to waste time and keep you unfocused.

That said, having blindingly smart people helping you navigate whatever business you've gotten yourself into is invaluable. As is having a Sacca-like angel investor tweeting daily about using your new wifi-enabled toilet-seat. But I think I've been doing this long enough to have plenty of friends I can turn to for advice or cheerleading, so again: don't see the need.

Another thing: getting enormously wealthy selling your company for ten million or fifteen million dollars is obviously pretty freaking awesome, but having had a bit of money in the bank the past couple of years I have come to realize what I really wanted in life was a job I liked going to every day and people I like working with. Because if I did end up fabulously wealthy that's pretty much what I'd end up doing, so why not just do it now?

Finally, something that has really turned me off of the startup culture in the Valley is what some people here consider "success". I'm sure Ashton Kutcher is a is a nice fellow, but the other day he tweeted something so completely ridiculous that it just sort of hit me like a punch in the face:

APLUSK: I find it interesting that facebooks last 2 moves have been replicating existing successful startups. Vark now foursquare...

The Vark emphasis is mine.

I am going to assume I don't even have to explain to you why calling Vark "successful" is a sad joke on so many levels. Like Vark there will be more companies that will sell this year for several million dollars and no substantial revenue. The only thing they illustrate is that advertising (Facebook, Google) is still funding most of the "successful exits" so many of these companies (read: founders/investors) experience. That is a pretty sad state of affairs and I don't want any part of it. (Obviously this does not apply to Federated Media of which I am a relatively substantial shareholder. Wink wink!)

So that's where I am with Simpleform and our first product called "mlkshk" (pronounced Milkshake, we're in pre-vowel twttr mode). I walk to and from work. We have a nice office with three 8 foot high windows lining one wall. To my left is a friend from FM who is building his own startup and helping me with mine, to my right is my wife who has some lovely screenshots of our product pasted on her wall that I need to share with the Friends of Simpleform mailing list of 227 near and dear friends.

We will build this application. You might use it or you might not. We have an actual plan for making money and we have such low overhead that we can play with that plan until we think it's right. It would be nice if more people did it this way. Life's too short to spend it sitting in a stupid meeting wishing you had more time to make something good.

* actually not anywhere near the list.

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Mail Me Daily, how it works:

  1. enter a website and email address
  2. check your email every morning for updates
  3. rejoice

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I'm so curious how this board actually rides. The wheels + bearings must make it weigh a ton, and all those wheels seem like it wouldn't go very fast because of the varying friction. Still, I'd love to try it here in SF.

Found this on Laughing Squid.

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I probably don't understand the iPhone 4 antenna attenuation issue (I barely get Photoshop) but…

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The internal layout likely dictates why the antenna has the break below rather than above—meaning they needed space for the camera—but still, I was holding my phone and I noticed my finger never goes between those buttons.

Update: Turns out you can't have an antenna at the top of the phone.

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Justin Watt, one of the finest engineers at Federated Media (and one of the best I ever worked with), is headed out on a trip around the world with his girlfriend Stephanie.

The best part, and something that is typical of Justin and Stephanie's attitudes in life, is they don't really have an end date planned.

While I don't think I ever had the courage to quit my job and set sail around the world, I feel pretty cool to know some people who are actually doing it. I do hope they can blog it all.

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Geeking out with this, but here's an idea on how templates and the template languages should do date formatting. Instead of requiring me to type (and remember) something cryptic like:

"%A %d %B %Y %I:%M%p"

I should be able to type something like this:

"Monday 12 July 2010 02:30PM"

And the formatter be smart enough to figure out that the first word is obviously a day name, the next number a day of the month since you wouldn't put a bare year after a day name, the month, the full year, and then following that is obviously a time.

So tired of looking up date formatting strings for every framework and language.

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This comment on Metafilter outlines from the inside how a successful hardware company can fail by focusing on short-term budget goals. The example of diverting phone calls to a certain customer support department because it saves you $2.47 is the sort of thinking that gets someone a bonus for the quarter because they hit their number. What a waste.

It also reminded me of a series of calls I made to Apple support in the early 2000's where I was mocked, hung up on, and finally, after many calls was able to get my computer fixed. Does anyone remember the joke that was Apple customer support?

The other bit in that comment that sticks out is how (the poster's estimation) 90% of the calls were actually software (Windows) related. Doomed from the start.

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Dear Friends,

I've been away for a while, but now I'm back. Here is what happened:

  1. I left my job at Federated Media.
  2. I started doing client work.
  3. I realized I dislike client work. The "client" part of client work.
  4. I worked on a secret project for someone else to be announced in a month. Kind of like client work but without jerky clients.
  5. Made enough money the past few months to take a stab at a real-live start up with my wife.
  6. http://www.simpleform.com/

PLEASE sign up for the Friends of Simpleform list. I promise there is very good news coming soon (like tomorrow).

 

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I haven't written a post in over a month. That's rare. I think I've just grown too consumed with work that I no longer have time to read my newsreader and post anything.

Stuff that has happened: I got an iPad of course. After a month of using it I ditched my laptop (didn't see that coming).

To replace my laptop I'm now running an iMac Quad i7 with 8 gigs of RAM. This computer just SCREAMS. I love it. It's been a few years since I've worked on a powerful machine. 

My iPhone broke, but Apple wouldn't replace it so I bought a Nexus One. I'm giving the thing a month (for real this time) but we're already about two weeks in and I think we're hitting snags. Too soon to tell.

Simpleform's first product is going to be announced soon. I'm in charge of putting the web site up and I am not good with CSS or HTML so it's taking longer than I had hoped. So as soon as I get that sorted then the site will be up and the product sort of announced.

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The Android WePad is coming soon. They even have one of those handy charts to show you why it's better than an iPad.

Sadly the interface is reminiscent of an Idiocracy TV.

WePad Android Tablet Launching Soon.jpeg
Idiocracy Screen

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"If VHS home recording is made legal then our industry is ruined."
"If CD quality music is allowed to be sold then our industry is ruined."
"If DAT is made legal then our industry is ruined."
"If the Rio PMP3000 is allowed to be sold then our industry is ruined."
"If file sharing is permitted then our industry is ruined."

The tactic is as old as the hills and used by some pretty dishonest people in the last few years to combat technology they feared would upset the nice apple cart they'd set up. If X happens, then 100% of Y will happen.

Because we are early adopters and because we live at the edge of emerging tech we laugh at the ridiculous arguments lawyers have managed to get in front of judges to uphold, until reason and consumer demand ran over those judgements.

That's why when I read posts about the iPad as this great creativity doom machine I feel a little bothered. Yes, if everyone is required to purchase an iPad tomorrow and not permitted to seek out other computing devices then, yes, it's true: we're fucked. But also nobody will be able to make iPad apps and uh, hmmm.

John Philip Sousa in 1906 (in)famously pointed out that recording devices were a danger to creativity. The quote is laughed at by many because it is similar to the statements at the top of this post. Not only does he predict creativity will be stifled: "These talking machines are going to ruin the artistic development of music in this country." Sousa also makes the claim it will be total: "When I was a boy...in front of every house in the summer evenings, you would find young people together singing the songs of the day or old songs. Today you hear these infernal machines going night and day. We will not have a vocal cord left. The vocal cord will be eliminated by a process of evolution, as was the tail of man when he came from the ape."

OBVIOUSLY the "vocal cord" in that quote is placeholder for musical creativity. Which of course, he was wrong about. But I think he was right to raise the flag about what recording devices meant and the industry they would give birth to. The stifling did actually happen. It was so accepted that we as consumers growing up in last half of the century didn't know a time when "remix and burn" was a normal and legal thing to do.

However, his argument about total annihilation of creativity was bogus, and I think to do it now is even more ridiculous given the century-long conversation that has occurred. Be wary of closed systems: yes. Accept that future generations will only have gray paint and DRM'd pencils to choose from? Come on. You and I grew up (probably) punching Hayes AT codes into modems when others were out running around on the playground. And generations before us were soldering capacitors and breathing lead infused smoke. And generations before that were relaying bawdy jokes by tapping magnets that would send an electrical charge across town.

Anyway, to get back to the title of this post, I will be buying an iPad this weekend because I enjoy using thoughtful, well engineered products. I have tried many times to use non-Apple computers, to use the open and "free" choice and you know what? They are terrible. Really bad! Worse than bad, they're almost creatively stifling.

I think more of those who bang the "freedom of computing" gong should spend a little less time proclaiming the end of creativity at the hands of others and instead start using these products. These are good products! They are built on top of Unix! Why not use them to build even better ones? Under the hood are bash prompts and frameworks that maybe even have lines of code they themselves wrote.

I would buy and use something as free and open as Ubuntu if I actually thought it worked very well. I am completely receptive to its story but absolutely repulsed each time I try to get anything done that isn't in a shell.

Basically I am saying:

If someone builds a better iPad/OS then 100% of my money will go to them.

That is the only true thing I can predict.

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Ars Technica is now blocking their content from people blocking their ads. The comments in this thread are priceless. People are threatening to never read Ars again because they can't get the content without ads. Imagine that!

The alternative is to actually sign up for a subscription and all ads would disappear. I think I might just sign up. I did sign up.

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Just a reminder: I'm writing another weblog over here. It's documenting my year of only listening to music from 2010 and I would love any suggestions you have.

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I'd heard a bit about this but wasn't sure if it was going to be something like a "Jackass Guide To Finding Good Drugs In Liberia". Last night I saw CNN is running a special where they present some of the stories, so I figured it must be worth looking into and it was. I was only going to watch a couple of parts before I went to bed and ended up watching the whole thing.

I should warn you, it is extremely graphic and sad.

The Vice Guide To Liberia

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A thread on MacRumors after the launch of the original iPod in 2001.

What I find most interesting about this thread is how ignorant people were of what Apple was really doing. Given the launch of the iPad, we're all a bit wiser (we'd like to think) of what Apple intends on doing with the device, so this time the arguments aren't just about how limited the device is in hardware features, but how closed the thing is to anything not approved by Apple.

I'm staying out of this whole iPad debate because I find the entire thing a colossal waste of energy. I am in the middle of trying to launch this company, get work, and adjust to my new life. The last thing I care to fixate on is what Apple does with Apple's money to make money.

I am a zealot about me, and less about standards, DRM, or whatever argument of the day is. Perhaps I'll regret it later, but for now it's fun to watch this stuff play out. Mostly I think because it's not a major investment, something I'd really like to try out at our house, and like the AppleTV won't be the only game in town for very long.

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After four and a half years I've decided to leave Federated Media. It has been the most rewarding work experience of my life. It wasn't always easy, but it was always worth it.

From the early, depressing days of machines falling over, Mike Arrington emailing, stuff just not working right, numbers off, and unhappy sales people—to seeing really smart people have a look at us and say, "Yes, I'll join" and then watching as these people come in and do some brilliant work. It's pretty much everything you could hope for when joining a company on the ground floor.

When you are a founder you have something like 1/4 or 1/5 of the company under your control. The four of you are sitting in a room just pounding away on your parts, trusting everyone is doing what they need to be doing.

Slowly as people join you give up a bit here and there, pretty soon you're at 1/10 or 1/20. I don't mean actual authority, I just mean you have to trust people with some of your stuff for the company to be successful. You can't do it all, and if you can find people who will own a bit of your 1/5 then you can focus on just the bits that really need your attention.

Without a phone call from John Battelle I would have missed out on an incredible experience. I cannot thank him, or the co-founders: Chas Edwards, Jennifer Charette, and Ken Snider enough for trusting me with the engineering portion of this company.

Very recently as we were restructuring, I realized that most of my original 1/5 was pretty much covered by smart, competent people who are just killing it. And that's when the startup itch returned. Getting back to the little room, thinking about big plans, forgetting what it's like when the servers are falling over…

I'll have more on this later. For now you can go ogle the obligatory, enigmatic landing page designed by my wife and partner for the new company here: http://simpleform.com/ and I'll have more about what I'm up to in the coming month.

I am also open to the following: beers, lunch, consulting of all types (I did put an engineering team together that stayed together for over four years), and any and all advice from people who've done this before me.

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Indie Relief is a Mac software fundraiser for Haiti. All proceeds from today's (January 20th) purchases will go to charities chosen by the developers. Such a great idea. Buy something!

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Your New Company Randomizer.

"A(n) enterprise iPhone app for drug addicts to buy friends." "A social networking platform for developers to find friends." "A(n) enterprise ad server for businesses to find sex."

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The ProjectTicker is the real-time inventory of all of the jobs active in the Integrated department.”

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I think Alex Payne's post titled Don't Be A Hero is a must read for engineers, but even more so for managers of engineers.

Hell, everyone who works on teams should read this.

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I've had this idea in my head but I doubt I'll ever use it for anything, so I wanted to write it down.

When I pause a TV show, on TiVo or Netflix I assume the play head will stop exactly where I left it. When I hit play it starts from precisely that point. This is great for when I pause to use the restroom or grab a glass of water.

However, when I pause and to go to sleep or to take care of dinner, I wish the play-head would slowly creep backwards until finally stopping at a good 20 seconds before where I originally stopped the play-head.

I often find myself hitting the 30-second rewind button on my TiVo controller whenever I come back to something I've been watching. It'd be nice if that could be programmed into what I'm using.

This idea though isn't about play-heads, it's about cutting out those small interactions we inevitably find ourselves participating in when we don't need to. My iPhone knows that if I just locked my device and decided to restart it within a few seconds it won't ask me for my passcode again. The same happens with the OS X screen saver password.

In both cases time affects precision or control of a variable which in turn, I think, provides a comfortable interaction. I like that.

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My wife has started a new companion weblog to her very popular We♥Prints site called We♥Art.

In her searches for affordable prints she tends to run into the not-so-affordable but beautiful works of art that she wants to point to. Really stunning stuff over there.

http://www.weheartart.com/

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This is a hilarious project. It takes a picture via your webcam the moment your merge fails and posts it to Twitpic and Twitter.

(For the non-tech, this is when you merge the branch of code you've been working on with the main code base. When it fails you have to pick through it like a fisherman undoing a bad cast. It usually happens 10 minutes before your train is supposed to leave the office.)

via andy

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Merlin talking at IDEO. This is a really good talk. I hadn't seen it before.

Most people in the position of offering people advice seem to gravitate towards prolonging people's need for that advice. It's fascinating to see someone realize that and struggle with what it is he's found himself the king of.

I was a huge fan of Merlin's site when he first launched it. I read the GTD book and noticed the more I developed my own homebrew system, the less I need these types of sites in my newsreader. Now everything goes into Taskpaper, and I just work my way down through the day. Stuff spills over, whatever.

I also tweak it every now and then. Recently I started marking everything in my inbox as read. It's no longer a todo list of unmarked/bold email that switches state when I happen to glance at it. If it's in my inbox it's unread. Works for me, probably won't for you.

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These 3d post cards are just lovely. My eye keeps going for unicolor animal toys. I think having a little boy who loves little animals (he squeaks when you ask him what sound a monkey makes) has tuned me into them.

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I'm not even going to ask to borrow $3.95 million dollars. Things would be weird between us, and you'd probably get all jerky at Christmas like, "Oh, I see you could buy everyone a KindleDX but couldn't swing the $98,750 you owe me this month on the loan! I'm Just Saying!"

So anyway, this home designed by Richard Neutra is for sale for $3.95 million. Which is a STEAL if you are the sort of person who buys things for 3.95 million dollars.

Either the person who staged it or the previous owner (who spent 10 years restoring it) made some mistakes, I think you can spend the .05 million you're saving on this place and get some new lights and kitchen appliances.

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I want to believe. Really I do. But the Nexus One still seems to draw two complaints in reviews:

  • A lot of UI work to be done to homogenize applications
  • Phone UI itself rough around the edges
  • Jeff Clavier on GDGT

When I was a kid there was this science show (I forget the name) that discussed an example of a ball falling to the ground. The question posed was what if the ball halved the distance each second, how long would it take for the ball to hit the ground? The answer was infinity, and that's what I feel like with Android.

Each iteration seems LEAPS ahead of the previous version. Apparently this phone hardware is much faster and has a very nice screen, but the UI still needs "an iteration or two" and that's the problem for me. They keeping needing that.

When they get microscopically close, perhaps I'll take another look, but I'm beginning to feel like it's just never going to happen.

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That only music from 2010 project I mentioned? I'm keeping a weblog here: radio.torrez.org.

Right now I'm going through the 09's looking for stuff I missed. There's no way I can go without music for a month, so January 2010 I'm allowing myself to catch up to last year's music.

I think I'll have a go at reviews—but reviews are like, just my opinion, man.

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My favorite blog of 2009 is Chris Dixon's. If you're in Tech you have to be reading this blog.

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Screw the other lists. This is truly the 30 Best Blogs right now.

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