I'm a little bummed about Favrd shutting down. From the first day to the last day of using it, it never changed for me—so it's surprising to hear it had become such a unwieldy burden.

I don't doubt it had, of course. I trust Dean to know when it's no longer manageable. I just didn't know it had become that bad. I wish I would have known this was coming.

Twitter lacks the ability to discover who has favored your tweets. When Favrd launched it filled that gap, but also made a point of filtering the webcocks* who had just began realizing there was a new way to strut around like they owned the place. Webcocks will always have a few thousand people happily slurping down whatever tripe they (or their team of writers) happen to write that day. The same thing happened to blogs almost a decade ago, but we had referrals and trackbacks and services that helped us discover who else was out there nodding their heads or laughing along with us.

What Twitter does not lack is the function (now standardized) to retweet. I dislike retweets for many reasons, but chief among them is it feels like an imposition on one's followers. That's just me though, others seem pretty happy to do it. All day. A lot. RT. RT. LOL. RT.

It's just not for me. I have retweeted all of 0 tweets. I have favored 3,057 tweets. I was telling a friend a few weeks ago that the new RT functionality seemed to be (in part) doing for the Twitter community what starring a tweet should be doing: "I like what you said, here is me telling you that."

I have started following many people who silently showed their approval of something I said. I could not even begin to count the number of people I have found through Favrd, so I'm grateful for that, but I think that's what's got me down the most: I wasn't done finding people.

  • Not sure if "webcock" was coined by Dean but it's why there was a rooster up in the corner of the site. It's such a great word I love saying it.