Dear friends who do not play games, I think this link I'm going to share is especially good for you to look at.

It's a short talk about video games and an innovative way to make gaming more accessible to people who think they are not good at games. (Unfortunately the game he focuses on gets panned by Yahtzee)

I've always wished my old games had a walkthrough option, where the game just starts playing itself and maybe you could jump in at some point. Especially during the grinding that happens as filler to the actual story. Someone could breathe new life into those old games if there was a pre-loader that would do this for any game sitting on my shelf.

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Here is how I would like to define relationship permissions to content on social networking sites like Flickr.

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In the first image I am assigning someone to a particular friend group. In the second image I'm telling the system which outer-most friend group I want to be able to access newly added content.

Something about selecting cones of permissions this way interests me. I would even like to use it to define severity of bugs, immediacy of problems, or even estimating the magnitude of difficulty something might have.

Oh neat: Caterina, one of the founders of Flickr, responds with some background on this idea and how it is not really a good way to define permissions. Nice to see that someone actually did it. I still think it'd be a nice UI feature for selecting magnitudes.

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Now that Youtube has linking directly to specific times in a video all we need now is a "play until" variable and someone can put together a Re-CAPTCHA-like product for transcribing Youtube videos.

After our son was born we started watching TV with closed captioning enabled for when the heater starts blowing. Otherwise we were just blasting the TV to hear above the noise. What I discovered is closed captioning (looking at you CaptionMax) sucks. There's no reason it needs to suck so much for deaf people on the web.

Semi-related: Ryan has a good idea that I hope to see soon. Basically someone needs to auto-generate synopsises so I don't have to watch a whole video or decipher a slideshare to get the gist. Seems like a job for scraping blogs to me, everyone generates a synopsis when linking, why not do some magic on it and produce a blurb for people. Seems like every site could include some JavaScript on their page to pull a synopsis if one has been generated.

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This is not so much lazy web idea, more of a wouldn't that be interesting: but how neat would it be to make a web site solely for the purpose of attracting bots which, as they crawl, would create profiles, connections, and activity streams. Something like a digital ant farm, I guess.

I don't know enough about bot cycles to know if they'd even visit much, but I'd sure like to find out.

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This iPhone/Touch skin is made to work with an App built for the visually impaired. It appears there is no App available at this time, however. For now it's more like a special keyboard with no application. Still a great idea. [via slantback]

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I've been a little busy lately: on October 27th Amber and I had a son. His name is Mark Patrick Torrez and he's the greatest. Absolutely the greatest. I am in heaven.

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Two projects released this weekend that are pretty cool if not a bit nerdy.

Huffduffer.com solves the problem of turning a list of MP3s (found on the web or your own) into an RSS feed for people to subscribe to. Excellent story behind the name, too.

Domai.nr helps you identify more creative ways to get the domain name you want by showing you how you can use the other less known TLDs out there.

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Joel from BB Gadgets shares a story about his hacker grandfather.

I love that damn blog.

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Finally, a cotton candy machine for your home! I have no idea how cotton candy machines work, but this one takes hard candy and spins it into cotton. Unbelievable. [via ohgizmo]

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Ben Brown and Katie Spence (the husband and wife team that previously brought you the very funny and cute iwanttoseethatparticularmovieyougotthere podcast) are launching a movie super-site dedicated to all movies on DVD, silver screen, BluRays, and surely day-long movies as well (timely!), for you to categorize and store for later.

It's called HOORAY MOVIES!

And the best part: many kinds of data feeds for the mishing and the mashing of movies for you to build things on top of their data.

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Programmer font surveys show up every couple of months. This one is pretty complete. I had been using Dina for a while, and before that Inconsolata. Recently I installed Droid for no reason other than it came from Google and it was free.

In productivity talks Merlin Mann refers to things like this as fiddling with your work environment as a form procrastination and he's right. Any monospaced font would produce perfectly fine code—but did you see that Ti92Pluspc? So nice. Installing it now…

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Two things made me very happy to discover today:

Garrett Murray started a new Flickr group called "My Day, Yesterday" for this video. Dean Allen joined him with this one. Let's have more of this!

Andy Baio and Joshua Schachter created Memeorandum Colors to help identify conservative/liberal bias (and shades in between) in their linking activity. If you're simply interested in running it head over and download now.

If you're into the geeky side of how it works, Andy includes it at the bottom. Today I learned about Singular Value Decomposition. Sweet.

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Take on Me: Literal Video Version. (I forgot who linked this, but thanks, and sorry for missing the credit.)

My mom would often walk by me watching MTV and would stand for a bit and watch with me. When the video was over she'd ask something like, "What did that mean to you?" or "What do you think that's saying to you?" The time she did that at the end of A-Ha's video was a tense moment that I still remember to this day.

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I just remembered, it's Gothtober time again, and the official site is back with a Christmas-like advent calendar to take us to Halloween.

The first video has a sample from a classic video that always kills me.

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For some reason I finally started poking around in Amazon's Mechanical Turk last week. It figures Andy'd be way ahead of me and used mturk for his latest project Girl Turk.

Andy also links to this survey done (on mturk of course) asking why the turkers turk. I read all of the responses (the whole time visualizing myself getting paid for each of those tasks) and there seems to be a general theme running: people do it because they want to kill time and they like seeing the money accumulate. I wish the surveyor would have asked how much people make on a weekly basis.

Seeing Andy's experiment go so well, performing a few HITS mysefl, and reading these responses, I'm suddenly completely fascinated with the system.

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Coming out of weblog retirement (almost one month!) to point to Availabot. Availabot is: a physical representation of presence in instant messenger applications, which means Availabot plugs into your computer by USB, stands to attention when your chat buddy comes online, and falls down when they go away.

I still want a USB enabled telegraph.

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No link on this post, but we (FM) just moved to the City (San Francisco) and everyone is in a state of shock at how different life has become. I just went down to the market in our building and bought an onigiri rice ball. ONIGIRI RICE BALL! I always hoped they've have buckets of rice balls in heaven, never did I imagine I'd have them within walking distance.

I've gone back to public transportation after having a car for a couple of months. It was nice having it, but in the end it was a hassle having to think about the drive. Plus I really like taking public transportation when it is not a bus. Check back with me when MUNI breaks down and I have to walk 7 miles.

Also, MUNI is my favorite source of photos.

Oh, our building? Yeah, it's the building that appeared in Sneakers. Be jealous…or, you know, join us.

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I happened to read two articles on sub-cultures on the same day. A piece on Internet Trolls from the NY Times and Adbusters' article on Hipsters. Both affected me enough to roll around in my head all day while I worked.

It's possible that with our little girl on the way my attention to "the future world" is a bit more focused. We're no longer planning a couple years in advance but decades, and of course, everything matters a little bit more.

So Alex wrote a very thoughtful reaction to the hipsters article (I initially found it by way of his twitter post) and it was met with thoughtful responses. It's a nice post and conversation, and somehow ties in the with the NY times troll article and even Derek's post on comments that has also been on my mind lately (gee, I think a lot).

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The Game Libratory (Library + Labratory) is just getting started. It aims to provide research opportunities on video games, and likely provide the chance for these researchers to play every freaking game imaginable.

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I've been playing around with the Google App Engine for the past few weeks. I threw a simple Django app [http://c-o-l-o-r.net/] up there to test out how the deployment tools worked and found them to be really nice. And if it were a popular app the usage reporting tools look like they'd be just as cool.

Brad Fitzpatrick just announced he and a few other Perl hackers are using their 20% Google time to create a Perl version of the GAE with no promises from the GAE team that it will be included. But if you're a Perl hacker looking for a project to contribute to, that seems like a really good one.

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There are very few games I would say I consciously wait for. I tend to make my decisions about games after they've been released, when I know I can walk down to the store and get it. The last time I think I really stressed about a release date was back when we used to scan .plan files of our favorite developers and designers.

Braid is a game I am waiting for. Jonathan Blow has been hinting on his weblog that the game is really close, but can't announce the release date due to some XBLA rule. He did mention, and so I will too, that this post on Joystiq gives some idea of the time frame. [psst, 4-6 weeks]

If you're like me and have very few games you get excited about these days, check out Braid.

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Excellently done campaign announcement. You might have already seen this, but Sean is an Internet-style friend, so I feel it's my duty to help him get the word out to his fellow Kansans. I think he has some pretty good ideas.

I must admit, I feel a little sneaky giving someone in another state money to run as a representative for people I do not know. But then again, this is Kansas…you know, Kansas…and that's still a state in my country's union so I was compelled.

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What the web was made for! Tracking the revolutions of a hamster wheel and converting them to miles. If the hamster ran as, uh, the crow flies, this is how far she'd go. Hamster Across America

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"I'm not here to make friends" is a montage of a common phrase found in reality TV shows. found on jonson's weblog

In our new house we are finally using the HD Tivo with Comcast and getting back into television. We're currently hooked on The Deadliest Catch. I think my wife has a crush on Edgar…I think I have a crush on Edgar.

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An interesting nugget of information in a terrific post on rc3.org is that George Bush, Sr. has a domain name and has held it for ten years.

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I've been pretty quiet lately due to moving and work, but when I heard that George Carlin had died it reminded me of an observation of his that pops into my head a lot in life:

"Have you ever noticed that anybody driving slower than you is an idiot, and anyone going faster than you is a maniac?"

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Today is my third anniversary at Federated Media. Saying "three years" sounds so short, I almost feel a little silly mentioning it, but it also nearly marks the date FM was born (June 1, 2005) so I figured it's worth pointing out.

I highly recommend everyone do this at some point. Quit your stupid job and spend a couple of years not just working someplace but working on something you really care about. Why not be someplace you want to be every day? Life's too short to wonder if it's worth the risk.

Of course, the other bonus is I get to yell at people "I've been here longer than you!" and it's always true!

We just announced a product I am really excited about. We're doing something that builds off our three years of experience and knowledge, and gives advertisers, publishers, and readers more than just a typical web campaign. That's something FM has always tried to do. Don't just run banner ads, pay attention, listen, and you'll make a better product or service.

Oh and we're hiring. Come work in San Francisco and you get to own projects like the CM Toolbox, our forecasting engine, publishing tools, you get to help our publishers, BBQ, attend outdoor hula hoop meetings (no laptops allowed!), jump in the bay, and best of all work with a lot of really caring people who work really fucking hard to make everyone happy. That's what I love most about this place: everyone here cares a lot about FM and those who work with us.

This is exactly the place I want to be every day.

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This looks interesting, The Start Conference:

Start is a one-day conference in San Francisco designed for smart, talented Web people to take hold of their ideas, follow their dreams, and start their own companies.

That's one sweet site, too. See you there.

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I kept threatening to take some photos of my zines. While we're packing for the move I took a couple of snapshots. The color versions are the originals pasted up. The zines were photocopied at my Mom's office and then distributed to friends around town.

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I love these Soda Can Stoves. Not sure if it's age or money, but I seem to remember doing a lot of projects like this when I was younger. Maybe I just don't have time anymore.

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For being small, San Francisco has a lot of neighborhoods in its 7x7 miles. When I talked about moving to the Outer Sunset yesterday I forgot to link the Wikipedia page for the neighborhood.

And, to be accurate, we're actually going to be in Parkside.

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San Francisco: No One Will Tell You When You Have A Bad Idea on Flickr.

Of course, today we just signed up to live in this City for a few more years. We found a place in the Outer Sunset which sounds a lot like saying we're moving to one of Saturn's Outer Moons—and that is not far from the truth—but we do get our own place with a yard and can still stay in San Francisco.

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Zappos has an interesting way of testing new hires, after four weeks if you're not happy about the job and the company, they'll pay you your full salary for the time you've been there, and give you a $500 bonus (possibly $1,000 soon). The reasoning is if you haven't bought into what the company is about, you probably won't be the type of Zappos employee they need.

Oh, also they expect about a billion dollars in sales this year.

If you're not following Zappos on Twitter, you should. They're one of the few companies understanding how to use Twitter as a component of their company.

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Two friends at work have started a unique podcast called White Noise Lounge.

From the about page:
We went back and forth like this for a while, cracking each other up with ideas like “white noise radio,” that played nothing but a continuous low hum, all—day—long. The next morning she was still giggling to herself about it.

I've been listening to them all morning. It's interesting how the different background noises can affect your mood. The idling Vespa made me anxious, the bridge joints were calming, and the sound of tinkling dishes and silverware was pleasant.

Sometimes life is too quiet, instead of turning on a TV or a distracting radio, why not invite some dishwashers into your house?

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Not sure where this is from, but I love it.

Sine vs Cosine.gif
sine vs. cosine

Update: Mike pointed out in the comments that it's sometimes called a "bullshit grinder" which lead me to a Wikipedia article with a little more information.

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Here's a simple idea: transparent Post-Its.

As an admirer of simple ideas and office supplies, has there been anything that has topped the Post-It? Makes me want to go to Staples this weekend and find out.

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A dream longtime coming: the ability to use your phone's camera to scan barcodes and then scrape all kinds of APIs to deliver data about the product. Be sure and watch the video demo.

It's interesting to me that the APIs he scrapes for data aren't Google's. I was shocked to find out that Google's replacement for their excellent Search API was a very light-weight AJAX search widget last month. I am hoping Google releases the real Search API at their developer conference this month.

thnx Brian White.

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May 2nd, Baltimore: "One of the juveniles held his hand in his pocket as if armed and demanded money. The student began speaking French and pretended that she did not understand their demands. The juveniles subsequently walked away from the victim and continued northbound on Guilford Ave." found on andrew pile's blog

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Since I don't explicitly write much biographical posts, I figure once in a while won't be too bothersome. I think the last time I updated my site that way it was the night before Amber and I were married. Since then we've been to Fiji [best vacation ever] and then got down to baby conceiving [success!].

Another life-changing event happened just yesterday: we bought a car. We'd been carless for over a year. While I LOVE taking public transportation and walking a mile to catch a train to take me two miles to catch a bus to take me five miles into work every day, I'd prefer that my future son or daughter did not have to admit to friends twenty years from now that they had been born in the back of a taxi.

So now we have this car and well…I LOVE IT ZOMG!!!1! I think the thing that will change the most is that I can stay up a little later and sleep in a little later. It means my day isn't ruled by the bus schedule out of Sausalito and I can pick up all the crackers and yogurt my wife needs.

Also: bitchin' stereo.

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Why NYC's Iconic Pizza Is So Tough To Replicate found on kottke. Seriously, there is no good pizza in San Francisco. Whenever I go to NY I manage to get at least one slice of pizza from a random shop, and it's better than any pizza I've ever had in California.

If you think you know, please leave me a comment. You should know that I have been to Delfina, Arinell's, Little Star, and A16. (SF does make a god damn good burger though.)

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This is my philosphy. I don't have much more to add to it. Buzz has a bit more to say on it so I'll just link there.

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Kevin Burton noticed a few stories in recent weeks about objects or places being preserved naturally.

Be sure and click through on the Shackleton story, the comments are just classic Internet silliness.

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The Droste Effect is when a package contains a photo of the package. It goes without saying that this sort of thing is the sort of thing I like.

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What an eventful week! I feel like talking about it.

First the torch thing here in SF. Two interesting things came out of that: my Twitter friends who were near the torch kept me updated throughout the day on what was going on, and second, Greg Knauss summed it up nicely.

Then there's Flickr video! What a bunch of hoo-ha about nothing. It seems a large group of people think Flickr is going to turn into YouTube—whatever that means. Anyway, here is why Flickr is no YouTube. Eleanor is easily the face that sold a thousand Flips (mine arrives today!).

Per my New Year's Resolution: I still haven't bought a single book. I only bought one CD in an emergency situation where I had to drive 600 miles and forgot to burn a CD-R. No DVDs. No video games.

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I want this device but for code. No network, no frills, just gcc or python or ruby and an intuitive editor.

Seriously, this product would sell at least 50 devices.

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Here's a microsite for a graphic novel about Laika the first animal in space. Definitely going to buy this one.

It's always so hard to know if a comic book (hate that term graphic novel, it's worse than "adult motel") is right for me, I usually just flip through it real fast to make sure I'm buying something I want to look at for a hundred pages. I can't read the dialog because it usually gives something away, so it's almost always a guess—which is part of the fun, I think.

A new comic book store opened up near our apartment called Neon Monster. It's good.

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I'm always interested to hear how other people are keeping up with feeds. This is basically what I do now after much moving around of feeds. I've got my favorite people, people I know, people I "must read" (that's the name of the folder), and those sites that have a nice signal/noise ratio. Then another folder called "main" that is nearly everything else.

When I just need to keep up with the "must read" people, I can jump in and out. When I feel like sitting down to really consume some sites, I can dive into the "main" folder.

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Interactive SpamAssassin 'required_score' charts showing thresholds and accuracy.

Expect to see a lot more charts in the next few weeks (lucky you!). I've got charts and graphs on the brain these days.

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Jason celebrates 10 years of running a very popular, personal weblog. I began reading him somewhere in the 98/99 year and never stopped. I copied him by registering my last name + .org and starting my own weblog.

Other things I know about Jason: Our birthdays are exactly one year apart (he's younger). We have the same number of letters in our first AND last names. Those are things I know about Jason.

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Is some highly available, geographically diverse, multi-billion dollar company's web site down or is it just my local ISP/Comcast/linksys router? http://downforeveryoneorjustme?com/ Excellent answer for the dudes on your local forum still using NetZero.

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Jeff Gertsmann, who you know from such reviews as Kane & Lynch: Dead Men, returns with a new site called GIANTBOMB.COM...uhh...is that right? I guess so. Well let's hope it blows. Up.

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Mat Honan didn't go to SXSW, but he's been twittering like he did.

But it is just a business. And if you ever fucking forget that at the end of the day your only purpose is to deliver to your customers what they need, you shall soon be back to tapping your trust fund. If you are not already.

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The last couple of days I've been setting up my laptop while I work. As I've needed apps I've downloaded them. I think it's neat to see which ones I really need to do what I do.

It doesn't include iWork, the XCode tools, or some PHP modules, but that's most of it.

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FriendFeed is finally public. It aggregates all your friend's feeds and your feeds into one lovely river of feed goodness. I like it. Here's mine, let's be friends!

Someone is going to accidentally put the output into the input of one of these many feed aggregation/repurposing sites and blow up the Internet. Just watch.

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I've been so busy the past two weeks I have pretty much lost all contact with Google Reader. Lots of good stuff coming up, I'll tell you about it when you're older. For now here's an update:

I bought a reissue of my favorite skateboard from when I was a teenager. Amber helped me get around the loophole of not buying video games in 2008 by buying me Professor Layton and the Curious Village. My good friend Mat Honan became an Internet celebrity for creating Barack Obama Is Your New Bicycle.

Plus it's been raining all week and I love rain so I'm particularly happy these days. Tonight I'm going to scan my old skate zines.

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This week Jason linked to an article which claimed it was possible to "unboil" an egg by unrolling the protein molecules (yuck). At work we all turned around in our seats, argued about it for a bit and then went back to work. Agreeing that even if it was possible we wouldn't want to eat it.

Michael Pusateri, a man with a long history of documenting his experiments and projects, decided to try it.

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Get Satisfaction points to a Tweet Sheet to help you remember Twitter commands. This idea is cool, but also reminds me of the days of keyboard overlays and dongles and sitting in computer class writing macros to convert letters into ASCII art. (HEY OLD MAN, TELL ME ABOUT FLOPPIES AGAIN!!!)

Tape it to your display, use it, learn it, then for gods-sake throw it away.

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In Choices Are Handcuffs Mike talks about how he used constraints to help focus his latest art project.

I love constraints. I create them sometimes just to get a handle on what I need to do. I resolved to not buy one video game or book until I finished every unread book and unfinished video game sitting in my apartment in 2008. I've been doing pretty well so far, and it's forced me to dive into some books and games I had previously given up on.

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Amber and I ended up at Needles and Pens this weekend and I turned the corner into the art gallery wall to find ZINES. And not just zines, but SKATE ZINES. I actually recognized Tod Swank's zine, of course, and a few other names seemed to be familiar.

I must scan and upload my zine (MEGA zine) before our next move. At least the issue with my friend Justin on the cover, all teeth missing or bent outwards, and smiling like a dope.

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Derek Powazek just launched Pixish a site for creating or fulfilling visual requests. Think Yahoo! Answers for images. Excellent idea, really excellent execution.

It's about time that Powazek got off his butt and did something, I mean, it's been almost a week since his other project shipped its first issue.

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Cabel has finally packaged up his FancyZoom project so regular folks can have those fancy Javascript image zooms on their site. He has examples at the end of the post to show you how it works. If you're a regular reader of his site you have undoubtedly been jealous of them.

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A billboard for a Murakami show in Los Angeles was hit by a couple of graffiti artists. Follow this link to find out why it was pulled down. found on wooster

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My first Django app has no real use other than it's terribly pleasing to click that random link (well it is for me). Does anyone really need to bookmark a color? I don't know, but now you can.

I do attempt to determine if the text color needs to be white or black but other than that it's pretty dumb. I was just pleased to have a completely senseless idea and get it up and live within a few hours with Django and Python.

I'm in the middle of creating a specialized CMS for Amber's print site in Django. Whenever I'm working on a project of that size, and in a new framework, I like to make simple little projects to test ideas. In this case I wanted to see how Django handled load, errors, and how to get mod_python and Django working correctly in a production environment.

Plus also I kind of liked the idea of owning a Google result for a hex color.

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Some people, when confronted with a problem, think "I know, I'll use regular expressions." Now they have two problems.
--usually attributed to jwz in comp.lang.emacs

I had seen jwz's quote a few times, it's a very clever, and in the past week as I've been playing with a particularly nasty regex in Erlang I keep muttering to myself variations—"now I have nine problems" for example.

Today I threw the quote into Google and found this post over a year old by the guy who taught me regular expressions, the author of Mastering Regular Expressions Jeffrey Friedl.

In his post he tracks down the original quote and possible origins. Apparently it was recently on Reddit, and jwz himself makes an appearance in the comments.

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I really wish there was a ffffound.com for sentences. I guess that's called a weblog. Anyway, here are two that I wanted to note this weekend:

Wikipedia's Martin Luther King Day page on South Carolina's May 2000 adoption of MLK day as a state holiday: "Prior to this, employees could choose between celebrating Martin Luther King Day or one of three confederate holidays."

From Mark Pilgrim's book "Dive into Python" on the subject of private functions: "Acknowledge that this is interesting, but promise to never, ever do it in real code."

In case you were ever considering learning Python, I cannot recommend Mark's book enough.

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I'd never heard of Ivor Cutler until blackbeltjones linked Pussy on the Mat. My brain keeps wanting to make connections with Daniel Johnston, but that might just be that harmonium. Here he is doing Shop Lifters on the Old Grey Whistle Test.

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Checking in with Joshua Davis I found this little gem. Click the items at the bottom to affect the objects in the movie.

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The Sound of Young America is my favorite podcast. Not one of, is. I love the variety of guests and the questions always seem fresh even when the subjects are not. He didn't earn the title "America's Radio Sweetheart" for nothing.

One of my favorite interviews he did was with Shelley Berman. A legend with a history peppered with land-mines other interviewers would likely trod upon, yet Jesse managed to keep the interview interesting and coax a bit more than you'd expect from Shelley.

Here's Jesse, the host of TSoYA, being interviewed by the also awesome Claire Zulkey.

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Venture Hacks on giving lawyers equity in itself doesn't apply to me, but it's interesting to read about the subject in a completely navel-gazing Valley point of view. The site is interesting in much the same way. via Ev (naturally).

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Wil Shipley on the MacBook Air. I'm just as confused as him why people are so upset about the firewire port and lack of access—that's the best part! The Air is exactly the computer I want to have around the house to code up an idea, read a book, watch a TV show, send mail, and check in on my feeds. Heck, I can even sit in bed (like I'm doing right now) in the dark and actually see the keys! That's an improvement over this hot, heavy, snarling Macbook.

Lighter, thinner, quieter, cooler, simpler...these are good things.

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Snuggle Bear Bear Revolution is a banner ad that mimics Dance Dance Revolution. I love reading Banner Blog but I am not sure if it's because I've worked with and around banner ads for almost 10 years or because they showcase the intense amount of creativity and work it can sometimes take to make an effective banner ad.

Either way they're a great example of being creative within constraints, and that's interesting to me.

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iTransmogrify! is a bookmarklet which transforms embedded Flash content into direct links to natively supported formats. Check out the link to see a demonstration.

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TV-B-Gone versus CES. Very funny, but I gotta feel sorry for these people. I worked at a few trade shows, and it's incredibly hard work to be up there presenting live over and over again.

A memory I cannot shake every time I see the word "hierarchical" is our emcee going crazy every show having to say that word. I was around when they wrote the copy and I remember when he first tried the line it just didn't come out right. Hi-yer-archik-cull.

After about the 90th time the word had become an entirely odd moment in an otherwise smooth show. His body would animate into these weird convulsions and he'd sometimes kick his foot forward like one would use body english on a wayward bowling ball. It's funny now, but back then it was painful to watch.

(It turns out this is the folks at Gizmodo having fun)

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Alex on beer in the Bay Area. Amber and I got way more into beer in 2007 than we ever were, especially after our trip to Amsterdam and Belgium where a friend gave me a long list of beers to try. I regularly make trips to Plumpjack down the street to grab our favorites plus anything I may have heard of (or maybe haven't).

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Notcot went to CES and brought back a list of items that are both cool and available (or nearly so).

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Nice detective work pointing out Network Solutions' trick of locking up domain names for a few days after you use their search engine (or "whois" from your command-line). found on daringfireball.

I've noticed this with a few other registrars and domain search services, but couldn't prove it. Glad to see someone caught NetSol with their pants down.

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  • Peter Tosh's Gibson. Need to find the exact year and model. Sweet lead guitar.
  • Brad Nowell's custom guitar would be impossible to find since it was made by a friend of his. Still a pretty guitar.
  • Gibson Thunderbird
  • *

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Leo Burnett's retirement speech found on his Wikipedia page.

Also, I hadn't heard this fact from Wikipedia: "Burnett's use of the animation medium to sell products was slyly given a nod in the anime series Pokémon. Disguised as muffled backwards dialogue, the character James of Team Rocket, is heard mumbling a line in the grip of a Pokémon's mouth. The line is "Leo Burnett and 4Kids are the devil, Leo Burnett!", mocking both Leo's introduction of animated commercialism, and Pokémon itself, which promotes the Nintendo games of the same title."

Update: the audio. Thanks, Adam!

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The Economist on the OLPC: "This leads to the final problem that has done the most to disappoint OLPC’s fans: the hubris, arrogance and occasional self-righteousness of OLPC workers. They treated all criticism as enemy fire to be deflected and quashed rather than considered and possibly taken on board." twittered by James

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Check out this crazy Java applet that displays the current wind patterns over the Bay Area. I am usually a weather doubter ("OH it can't be that bad, they just want to scare you!") but today I got the full force of the storm, saw lots of damage and even got lifted a bit while walking home.

It's one thing to drive in bad weather, it's another to have to take public transportation. I gave up and came back home. The last thing I ever want to do is get stranded in Sausalito. link sent by Erika

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This guy's father has been drawing a face on cards and cakes since as long as he can remember. He finally decided to ask his dad where the face came from.

I linked to the top of the category it was placed in, so you can start at the top and keep reading each entry in chronological order.

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Watch as Robert Reed, the man who played Mike Brady on the "Brady Bunch", makes an impassioned, cogent argument about why he would not be in the last episode of the series. It's both very funny to read and sad to consider how neurotic and tortured he must have been playing Mike. found on the Damn Hell Ass Kings

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I do not need a new Flash game! Especially not one so very clever! I love the ghosting of your previous attempt, it's like in racing games when you get to race against your previous lap. found on n0wak

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Kevin Kelly's eBook called 200 Documentaries You Must See Before You Die is now free for download. Kevin is using some kind of Yahoo Ad call in the new Adobe Reader. If you have an older version of Adobe Reader or use Apple's preview tool you're not going to see the ads—but you can still read the book for free.

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