I agree with this mini-review completely "(TidBITS: Coda Plays Web Developers a New Tune". I've been using Coda for a couple of days now, once to add some feature on FP and once to mock up a site for testing an idea. Both times I felt like it was really cool but lacking a few important features--or just got other things completely wrong actually that's not true, I don't know why I said "completely", I think I just don't work the way Coda wants me to work and it's irritating because it's sooo close to being my favorite app of all time.

sites-paper.jpgThe interface has a few surprises that confused me. The top level "view" buttons seem to be doing double-duty as noted in the TidBITS article, and I found myself lost a few times while flipping through tabs. Why would I ever want to see rendered, plain-text CSS? These things seem just an iteration away, so I think they'll figure it out.

I think it all comes down to the fact that I no longer build sites straight on the production server. Any project, large or small gets an SVN repository and a local Apache server (w/MySQL + a doctored /etc/hosts file to mimic the live server). I think Coda would have been essential seven years ago when I lost the ability to use Homesite on my PC when I switched to OS X, but now it only takes about 10 minutes to set up a complete development environment that mimics my production that I can build everything in my own sandbox, commit changes, then have them available when I get to the office.

So will I buy Coda? I think so. I prefer TextMate to SubEthaEdit and I rarely edit things directly on the server, but there's something about Coda that I know I'll miss once it expires. Weird, huh?

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A long time ago I wrote a short bit about a local Los Angeles Metro TV personality /commercial star named Cal Worthington. Every month or so I get a few visitors (Google, I assume) who read through and add their own LA area memory. Check out the comments, they span almost three years!

The thread itself has gotten quite long, much longer than my little germ of a post, and it makes me happy to see something continue to grow like that as each person adds their own memory. It's like one of those registry books that sit in some bar in a corner of the world.

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