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I just converted my Flickr Account to my Yahoo ID. It took longer to find my old Yahoo account, get the password reset, marvel at the complete ball of shit that Yahoo.com proper is, notice all my email at my old Yahoo address was deleted (that's a "kewl" feature they got there), than to click this button:

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I always thought the job Six Apart did in acquiring LiveJournal was terrific. The most passionate, opinionated group of users on the planet seemed to (afaik) accept the purchase and appearance of ads with hardly a whimper. Of course, it's possible I wasn't paying attention, but it seemed to be very much a non-issue and I think the people at Six Apart and LiveJournal are the reason why it didn't become a fotolog-style blowup.

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Flickr_logo_gammagifv1 I just received this notification that my "Old Skool" Flickr account is going to be migrated to Yahoo either by choice (I can change it by March 15th) or they'll just do it for me.

Fine, whatever, I think it's lame as I liked having my old sign in not tied to Yahoo but borgs will be borgs. The interesting part is they say:

"...95% of your fellow Flickrites already use this system and their experience is just the same as yours is now, except they sign in on a different page...."

If 5% of my audience, die hards from the early days (the ones who told friends who told friends), had decided on doing something a particular way and did not change for several years after being give a choice to—I just don't think I'd have the guts to email them telling them they were no longer allowed to make that choice.

Maybe 5% is an acceptable number, I really don't know how many users there are but 5% seems enormous to me.

I've never managed a user base the size of Flickr, but I'd have trouble clicking "send" to 5% of my "Old Skool" peeps if I was them.

I dont' think anyone will care about this on March 16th, but it's that initial communication and the following weeks where people will gripe and be annoyed at having to join or else, it really does feel like a bummer.

Also, Monday morning quarter-backing: They should have rolled out these new awesome features and said, “Sorry, your account can’t access them because it uses Yahoo API’s tied into login. Wanna switch?” Of course, knowing nothing about the infrastructure or time constraints ($) this probably wasn't an option, still, I wouldn't have felt so bummed about it.

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After finding this story on BoingBoing I thought about how easy my mom would fall for something like that. Now  that she recently retired and is on the web more, I 

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Dropparachutelarge I've decided to start posting every idea for a site I have because otherwise I stew over them and never do them, and then hate myself for not having any time outside of work to build these things. I keep a list, you see, of every idea I have--dumb or not--and the date I came up with them. They usually aren't very good ideas, and if they are good, someone usually already does it.

So here is one I had a couple days ago when thinking about one of the difficult things about mailing stuff to people: I hate mailing stuff to people. I hate finding a box that fits, and wrapping the thing up so it doesn't break. I hate finding postage and of course tape suitable for mailing. Above all I hate going to the post office.

About a year ago, I had the idea of selling self-addresses stamped padded envelopes. You would go to a site and enter your address, your friend's address, pay a little bit of money and then your friend is mailed a padded envelope containing a padded envelope that is addressed to you with postage paid. Your friend simply inserts whatever he was sending you, tapes it up, and drops it in the mail. So, a year on I realized there could be a whole online store where people enter stuff for sale and enter the size and weight (I'm told eBay lets you type in UPC #'s and it figures out the size and weight for you by using magic).

I think it'd work best for video games, as they have the best cost/size/weight ratio. So if I was starting it I'd focus only on video games as they would all fit nicely in a padded envelope.

Though Amazon has the infinitely cool S3, I still think my idea of web storage has a spot somewhere. The entire idea could be deployed on S3, but I think the authorization would be a sticking point, and I'd prefer to not require apps to register with Amazon. I still want to do that one.

I have another idea that I think I'm going to hold onto for another week. It would probably take about a week to build properly, and it would solve the whole problem I have with sharing my Wii # or my phone # with friends. I was reminded of it after seeing Andy's link to this post by Simon Willison about whitelisting.

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78379_bigiphoneinhand Them Saying: I have these ferry tickets, they expire in June, do you want to buy them?
Me Thinking: Mmmm, June...iPhone...June...

Them Saying: The triathlon is in June!
Me Thinking: Mmmmmmmm, touch screen, wide-screen iPod...

Them Saying: In June it will be your two year anniversary at work!
Me Thinking: Mmmmmm, bonus money go to iPhone

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Url The part of this interview with Steve Jobs I identified with was this:

I got to know this man, whose name was Larry Lang, and he taught me a lot of electronics. He was great. He used to build Heathkits.
... I mean you looked at a television set you would think that "I haven't built one of those but I could. There's one of those in the Heathkit catalog and I've built two other Heathkits so I could build that." Things became much more clear that they were the results of human creation not these magical things that just appeared in one's environment that one had no knowledge of their interiors. It gave a tremendous level of self-confidence, that through exploration and learning one could understand seemingly very complex things in one's environment.

I had a similar influence with my dad. Although he wasn't handy with electronics he could fix cars and pretty much build whatever he wanted with metal or wood. He would always show me how something worked by lifting the hood of an engine and explaining what was going on with the wires and tubes, or showing me how a wall should be framed and explaining the physics of it. He'd always take a break with what he was doing to explain why he was doing it.

When I got older it became second nature for me to not just accept something worked, but take it apart and learn how it worked (and probably break it). I wasn't comfortable using something like an iron or a bicycle gear without having some idea what was going on on the inside.

I broke a lot of irons and bicycle gears. And doorknobs. And this one gun that shot sparks. Slot cars. Other people's slot cars...

When I finally got my hands on a computer I could program, I set to learning how software was made by typing in all the sample code from the backs of magazines. At first I was completely perplexed as to what I was typing, but slowly I'd start to notice patterns and pick up what variables were by noticing if I changed a number from 10 to 50 I'd have 50 bullets instead of 10 when I played the game. It was kind of magical, I could make the computer do anything I wanted it to do—or at least I had some idea what was going on.

Though never really all that excited about making free calls, I was fascinated with the phone system for some time. It was an open playground of stuff people didn't know about or took for granted. You could call numbers that would tell you what number you were calling from, you could amaze your friends with ring-backs, there were party lines you could talk to other people on and they'd give you numbers to try out. And holy crap, this thing had been in our house all this time!

Eventually I got bored. The people you met were kinda odd. And then there were these silly "hacker crackdowns" fanned by luddite-journalists in need of a boogey man as the Cold War was ending. It felt a lot like it does now with the silly terrorism plots and bird flu they've now latched on to. Either way something I enjoyed toying with became a black art, and I moved on to other things. Around that time I became aware of the Internet and college and the rest is history.

I was glad to read this interview because I've always had an admiration for Gates and Woz as being engineers, but never thought of Steve as one, or having a background similar to mine.

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Readerloading After reading a few good reviews of Google Reader, and a good recommendation from a friend, I decided to chuck my copy of Newsfire (I literally had to remove it from the toolbar as I am programmed to click it frequently) and upload copies of my desktop OPML and my laptop OPML—they hadn't been in sync since I stopped using NetNewsWire.

The first thing I realized was that I lost DaringFireball's special members-only, full-text feeds. Though disappointing, now that I'm reading in the online reader, it's no big deal to just click over every so often from his regular abstract feed. I do find I check his site a lot less now, though since the Linked List isn't consumable. If I only had one thing to be on my wish-list it'd be the ability to read authenticated feeds as I am also missing out on my own authenticated feeds we use at work.

So far, the experience has been very good, and if you follow more than 10 feeds, it's completely worth moving to the web.

Finally, my fancy new Sony Ericsson K790a with its built in RSS reader got its ass kicked the moment I signed into Google Reader for mobile phones. Now anything I read at home, at work, or on my commute is instantly marked as read.

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Link: Maniacal Rage. You might remember a post...(04 January, 2007).

Awful story of MacZOT's Brian Ball taking advantage of Garrett. The part that is amazing is Brian knew he was going to default on it, continued to sell it and ignore Garrett so he could weasel out of the contract. Not only that, Brian has the gall to claim it was (at $5,000) "OVER-VALUED".

The result: XPad is now free.

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