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On our flight back from Ontario I happened to read an article in the in-flight magazine about indie record shops. At one point they mentioned an LA record store that outlasted all the other hole-in-a-wall indies (No Life, Rhino, Zed's): Aron's on Highland, and how it had finally closed.

For a moment I felt a little sad about the loss of that shop...and then I remembered how much I hated that place and having to go there.

  1. The parking lot sucked. See this photo of it? That shot makes it look like a football field of glorious LA parking. Here's the truth. It sucked pulling up to the driveway and seeing about three other cars bouncing around trying to get their car out because they couldn't easily turn around and there was no parking.
  2. A few minutes in their used section and you could always find CD-R burns of albums. If you didn't make sure it wasn't an CD-R you'd find yourself at home with a cheap, home-made burn that you couldn't sell back to Aron's because they had a sign up that said, "We Don't Buy CD-Rs!"
  3. There's a reason people in movies who play record store clerks snicker at the music you buy.

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Since my post last month I now have Vox invites up the Vox right now, so if you're a friend of mine and you want to check out Vox send me an email.

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<a href="http://torrez.vox.com/" style="float:left;"><img src="http://up0.vox.com/6a00bfbe21e0c8e67000bf76c6d819954a-50si" alt="View torrez’s Blog" width="50" height="50" style="margin: 0 10px 10px 0;"/></a>
<p>Wow, nag screens work apparently. I read about Newsfire the other day, downloaded it and have been using it alongside NetNewsWire just because I like the way it works and feels. I didn't really intend on buying it until that damn nag screen finally nagged me into Paypal. The only thing stopping me from full-time use is the lack of syncing. But still, I sure do like how it works, and for $18 I don't have to get nagged every 20 minutes.</p>
<p><a href="http://torrez.vox.com/library/post/nag-nag-nag.html">» Read more on Vox</a></p>

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  <div class="vox-cross-post">
<a href="http://torrez.vox.com/" style="float:left;"><img src="http://up0.vox.com/6a00bfbe21e0c8e67000bf76c6d819954a-50si" alt="View torrez’s Blog" width="50" height="50" style="margin: 0 10px 10px 0;"/></a>
<p>SixApart released some Vox (¢) updates today, and one of them is a big one, cross-posting to TypePad. Just checking out if this works.</p>
<p><a href="http://torrez.vox.com/library/post/testing-vox-to-typepad-posting.html">» Read more on Vox</a></p>

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So, I accidentally landed on a Slashdot/Ubuntu page today, and the anti-Mac user sniping made me think about those little badges people used to put on their sites that said "Made on a Mac". I don't think people realize how many of us developers are actually making things on the Mac. (So many that they mock honored the non-Mac users at a recent Rails Conf).

I thought, "Whatever happened to those badges? Why don't we see them anymore?"

Well, it wasn't hard to find out. You can get them here, though god knows why you'd want to. The placement guidelines are fine, and I understand why they would exist, but the thing looks so bad to start with, and the 7 point trademark license kind of makes you wonder if even thinking about placing their ugly badge violates some rule.

Staring at that little GIF of generic blandness, you can almost imagine the 440 hours of meetings, lunches, and lawyer billing it took to make it.

It might as well say, "Made on a Computer".

Oh, and, since I'm displaying it, I have to also note:
Apple, the Apple logo, and Mac are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. The Made on a Mac Badge is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., used with permission.

Joy.

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